Fey Desire

I read the old fairy stories, and in them I find a world that stirs my heart. As I turn the pages of that book, a longing buried deep within my chest rushes to the forefront of my consciousness. My intellect, my will, my affections, they are all overcome by a conviction that *that* world, the one of the fairy stories, is the *real* one. The air in that land carries the scent of reality. The bells have the ring of truth. The waters pulse with life. I feel I know that realm better than my own, even though many places there are shrouded by dark clouds or illuminated by unapproachable light. I expect mystery there. One time, I turned down a path and discovered some well of blessed water. That was truly a delight. Often I’ve entered the hall of the King and eaten at his table while his bards tell stories of ancient and mighty deeds. Faery is a perilous place to sojourn: one goes there and comes back changed. Wounded, more often than not. I went, only to have an intoxicating desire aroused, and then I had to close the book. Now, I sit here in my room, returned from a land of light and enchantment, back in a world that, I am told, lacks the wonders of Faery.

And yet, what if there really are holy waters and enchanted bread and elixirs of life? What if ordinary things can be caught up in Mystery and used for purposes beyond what we’ve imagined? What if the things of Faery were actually the echoes, the shadows, hints of our reality?

I think they are.

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From FPR: Sources of Order

The links below are from a series that appeared on Front Porch Republic recently. Susannah Black contributes to the argument for an older understanding of politics, the common good, and order. (Plus, there are references to Althusius, so it has to be good.)

Part I

Part II

Part III

Conclusion